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Opinion

Shutting off your study brain

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I’m terrible at relaxing, and since starting university, it’s bugged me that I could never seem to get properly invested in a good, narrative-driven video game the way I used to when there are readings to do and projects to start on.

I’d heard for years about the benefits of having a work space vs. a rest space (the same idea that says not to study in bed, because it’ll make it harder to sleep), and finally realized that was the issue. I’ve always been a primarily PC gamer, but I realized sitting at my computer has been wired into my head as being in a work space. So I pulled out an old, original Playstation, and finally took the time to dig into a classic RPG that I’d been meaning to play, sitting away from my computer and all the work contained in it. And what do you know, I was able to get engrossed in it for hours.

Now, instead of not knowing how to relax, my problem is that I need to make time to play the game. But at least I have a method to relax, and that is an incredibly healing thing. Turns out, when studies tell you how your brain is wired, they can actually be right. I’m as shocked as you are.

Image: Caleb Campbell/The Cascade

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