British Columbia’s new school curriculum

In a changing world, the method and approach of educating younger generations must evolve with society. In British Columbia, the previous kindergarten to grade 12 curriculum needed to be updated…

Passing the torch of knowledge

There’s a saying that “Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire,” and I couldn’t agree more. On Wednesday, Jan. 31, I had the…

Kin Korner: financing your education

By Melanie Manson and Connor MacMillan Kin Korner is a health and wellness column by the students of Joanna Sheppard’s Kinesiology 360 class. Check back every week for a wide variety…

The role of LGBT curriculum in schools

Weeks ago, the Langley School District issued a letter to students and parents detailing its intention to educate students about the rights of LGBT students. Specifically, the letter acknowledged that…

Sailing aimless-ishly

I seem to have not planned out this whole education thing. Don’t get me wrong, the boat is going in the desired direction, but the path isn’t as direct as…

Level-based education solves the passing problem

We seem to be allowing students to graduate from high school with the mindset of, “Hey, I can barely show up and try, and still get by? Neat-o!” This is not neat-o at all; it is a travesty.

Programming education

The philosophy of the “first year experience” in which students have the opportunity to exercise curiosity and expand awareness is one that UFV nominally supports. It’s a period of one’s life dedicated to exercising curiosity, a time of exploration and discovery; ideally, first year students have the opportunity to shop around and discover different areas of interest, before fully situating themselves in a program. But what is the reality? It seems many students are punished if they are not ready to be streamlined into a program of their choice. In fact, more and more, UFV expects its new students to be readily “programmed,” having selected and declared a program path before they’ve taken the time to shop around.

Why minimum wage jobs are good for the soul

I’ve had my fair share of minimum wage jobs. And even after all the mistreatment from customers, managers and difficult coworkers, I still think that this sort of employment is good for the soul, and not just in a Calvinist sort of way.