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Artist Q&A

Q&A: The Parish of Little Clifton

When I met CIVL charts climber The Parish of Little Clifton a.k.a. Simon Bridgefoot playing at a house party, I was blown away by the 20-year-old’s serious talent. Undoubtedly, Bridgefoot brings a musicality to electronic music too often overlooked; he lovingly manipulates his computer and board the way a gypsy strokes the strings of a well-cherished guitar. Bridgefoot styles his wide-ranging electronica music as “seasonal pop,” a melodic upbeat mix with strong rhythms and innovative sounds. Already with half a dozen albums under his belt, Bridgefoot makes music for the sheer joy of it as part of Cultus Vibes, an online indie label that prides itself on offering music for free.

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By Jennifer Colbourne (The Cascade) – Email

Print Edition: July 18, 2012

When I met CIVL charts climber The Parish of Little Clifton a.k.a. Simon Bridgefoot playing at a house party, I was blown away by the 20-year-old’s serious talent. Undoubtedly, Bridgefoot brings a musicality to electronic music too often overlooked; he lovingly manipulates his computer and board the way a gypsy strokes the strings of a well-cherished guitar. Bridgefoot styles his wide-ranging electronica music as “seasonal pop,” a melodic upbeat mix with strong rhythms and innovative sounds. Already with half a dozen albums under his belt, Bridgefoot makes music for the sheer joy of it as part of Cultus Vibes, an online indie label that prides itself on offering music for free. 

How did you get started? 

In high school I made loads of cheesy Garageband tracks on my laptop, and then about one year ago I began actually being intentional and creative about what I was composing.

How did you shift from an acoustic folk project to electronica?

I became insecure about my voice and intrigued by the composition of electronic music, so it just seemed natural to make the switch over. I was also very curious as to how a lot of the electronic records I was listening to were made. I remember listening to Baths’ Cerulean thinking, “How does he do this?” and a year later I can listen to it and understand what’s going on.

Why “The Parish of Little Clifton?”

When I was thinking about a moniker I just googled my last name to see what would come up, and in about two minutes “The Parish Of Little Clifton” came up and I thought it would look nice in type.

If your sound was a colour, what would it be? 

I think the stuff I’m writing currently is a deep navy with moments of gold and green – but I think the album art for Portia is a pretty accurate representation of the colour of that record.

What would be your dream show?

If Brian Eno did an ambient set at the Orpheum.

Top five influences?

Brian Chan, Jocelyn Price, Jordan Klassen, Nathan J Moes, Josh Daignault, Indiana Avent.

You’ve been touring this summer – where have you been and where are you going?

Well, so far 2012 has brought me all the way across Canada, hitting every major city with a friend’s band, taking me past Winnipeg into the deep east. And in June I did the less treacherous trek to Winnipeg and back hitting all the big ones again (Edmonton, Saskatoon, Winnipeg, Calgary and a nice rest in Regina) with Teen Daze and myself. And up next is hopefully a local show with friends and a show on August 3 in Victoria

Where did you get the sounds for your latest album This Thirsty Fountain?

A lot of it was ripped off of old records I bought at MCC. Some of it was recorded with a little H1 field recorder. Etta James vocal samples on a track; Aphex Twin on another. I think there’s a Lady Gaga sample on there somewhere too.

Have you done any collaborative work? With who?

I have, but none of it is finished, or looks like it will be finished anytime soon. But if you count remixes, I did one for Oh No Yoko!, Teen Daze, Bank Heist, The Patience, and HRDWTR. My mom and sister have actually sung on a few tracks too.

Anyone you would like to collaborate with in the future?

Yeah, I want to start a punk band called Goof Rat with Liam Hamilton of Oh No Yoko!/Real Boys.

Future plans for your music?

Start charging for my music sometime soon! I’m working on some new stuff, more moody and ambient. Not as fun, but I think it’s pretty cool, still kinda interesting, just less house beats. Maybe Honda will use a Parish track for their next Civic campaign.

Any upcoming local shows? 

Your basement, this summer? Please?

The Parish of Little Clifton’s music can be found on his Bandcamp page.

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